Healthy Living Tips

  • Allergies

    Allergies to pollen and mold can make the outdoors seem off-limits, but it doesn’t have to be that way.

    For people with allergies or asthma, the march of the seasons can seem like a pollen parade, starting when trees pollinate in the spring, followed by grasses and the release of mold spores in the summer, and ending with ragweed in the fall. These steps can help you enjoy the outdoors without sending your immune system into overdrive:

    1. Get a head start on prevention. Start taking allergy medication two weeks before your symptoms usually begin, as recommended by the American College of Asthma, Allergy & Immunology.

    2. Know your triggers. If you can identify which plants or fungi cause your symptoms, you can try to avoid them.

    3. Keep track of the daily pollen count for your area. If the pollen count is projected to be high, save outdoor activities for a lower-count day.

    4. Know when to go (out). If you head outdoors on cloudy or windless days, or right after it rains, you’re less likely to encounter a lot of pollen in the air. Pollen favors hot, dry, windy conditions.

    5. Avoid outdoor chores, if possible. Mowing grass and raking leaves exposes you to pollen and mold, respectively. Hire someone for those tasks, if you can, or wear a dust mask if you take them on.

    6. Modify your workout. Save running and other strenuous activities, which can make it harder to breathe during pollen season, for the gym and enjoy less taxing forms of exercise, such as walking, when you’re outside.

    7. Consult an expert. An allergist can identify the allergens that give you trouble and recommend treatments, such as allergy shots, if over-the-counter medications don’t offer sufficient relief.

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  • When Food Hurts

    Did you know your tolerance for certain foods can change throughout your life?

    Digestive concerns, including acid reflux, are more common during older adulthood. As you age, you may find that foods you once enjoyed leave you with a painful burning sensation. Potential reasons for this include:

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  • In the United States, millions of people have chronic kidney disease (CKD), but many don’t realize it because the symptoms typically only appear late in the progression of the disease.

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  • General Wellness

    Your sleeping preferences can impact your health.

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  • You know exercise is good for your heart, but how, exactly, does your heart benefit?

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  • Painful periods are not a fact of life. Learn more about what might be causing your symptoms.

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  • The National Cervical Cancer Coalition says cervical cancer is the second most common type of cancer in women. Fortunately, it is also preventable. 

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  • Cold & Flu

    Trying to determine if you have a cold or the flu? What are the facts about flu vaccinations? What precautions should you take to protect your family? This resource page will help provide plenty of answers.

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  • Seasonal Health

    The chill of winter is in the air, and that means there is one thing on your kids' minds: snow!

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  • Seasonal Health

    Dropping temperatures, holiday stress and changes in routine can all put strain on the cardiovascular system. Be mindful of ways to minimize your risk.

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