Healthy Living Tips

  • Seasonal Health

    The chill of winter is in the air, and that means there is one thing on your kids’ minds: snow.

    Because it’s rare not to experience some snowfall in our area, it’s likely that your kids will be outdoors and having fun as soon as the first flake falls. The last thing your little ones need is an injury to put a damper on the winter weather.

     Use these do’s and don’ts to keep outdoor safety top of mind—and your children safe—before the snow melts away:

    • Do keep a close eye on your children when they play outside. Supervision is often the best form of prevention.

    • Don’t let your children head outside on an empty stomach—their bodies will burn more calories than usual in the cold.

    • Do dress your little ones in layers, preferably light, noncotton ones for the most warmth. If they get wet, they can remove the outer layers to keep the frigid water from seeping to their skin.

    • Don’t forget to accessorize. Boots, mittens, and hats or beanies are must-have items for winter play outdoors.

    • Do ditch clothes with drawstrings, which can become tangled in tree branches, caught on sleds or be tugged during play and cause injury. Use clothes with Velcro fasteners instead.

    • Don’t forget the sunscreen. A snow-covered landscape is a giant reflective surface for the sun’s ultraviolet rays.

    • Do get the lay of the land. Be sure you know where your children will be playing. Keep them away from ponds, streams, ditches, roads and fences. Only allow them to sled on slopes that are not too steep and are free of trees and other obstructions.

    • Don’t skimp on safety gear for your children’s activity of choice, such as a hockey helmet for sledding or wrist guards and hip pads for skiing.

    • Do mandate breaks in the action. Children may be reluctant to stop playing from time to time, but it’s important for them to come inside, warm up for a bit and hydrate.

    • Don’t allow snowball fights. This rule may be a bummer, but it’s better than dealing with the injuries that could result from a direct hit to the eye.

    With the proper precautions, your children can see out winter safely—and be ready to enjoy the spring fun to come.

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  • Seasonal Health

    Dropping temperatures, holiday stress and changes in routine can all put strain on the cardiovascular system. Be mindful of ways to minimize your risk.

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  • Parents should take extra measures at home and in the car to protect their toddlers from secondhand and third hand dangers.

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  • General Wellness

    Just because you’re getting older doesn’t mean you have to accept bladder problems.

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  • Besides taking all the right steps to fight the flu, there’s a chance that it still may happen. Just in time for flu season, the U.S.

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  • Fall can be exciting for many young children—especially toddlers in daycare or kindergarten. For parents, however, it’s important to be prepared to keep your children healthy, especially from illnesses like hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD).

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  • A Guide to Mammograms and Breast Awareness

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  • If you or a loved one is 65 years of age or older, the flu could be more dangerous than you realize. As we age, our immune systems get weaker. With a weakened defense system, the risks of catching viruses and developing complications increases. 

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  • Classes are back in session, but your children aren’t the only ones doing homework. You might be preparing to help them fight strep throat, which has been surging through their school.

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  • General Wellness

    Your teen likes to stay up late but has to get up early for school. Sleep is critical at this age, so it’s important that you learn to help your teen sleep better.

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