Healthy Living Tips

  •   Wellness

    Flu season, and the potential for missed time from school, work and family activities, is around the corner. Unfortunately, flu season begins early as October. 

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  •   Halloween

    Costumes, candy, black cats and full moons—October 31 can bring out the kid in all of us. Don't be deceived, however, because this spooktacular, kid-friendly holiday can present many dangers.

    Ensure your children stay safe this Halloween by making sure they follow these health and safety tips.

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  •   flu

    Flu season has arrived. Protect your family now against this year’s seasonal flu virus and get vaccinated at one of our 30+ locations for only $30 ($30 flu shot valid during the 2017-2018 season for Self-Pay Patients).

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  •  

    While not everyone is sensitive to toxic plants like poison ivy, for four out of five people, accidental contact can result in a painful, lingering rash. Touching these plants can be dangerous or even fatal to those who are severely allergic.

    Walking in dappled sunshine under leafy trees is one of the most pleasant warm weather experiences — unless an encounter with a poisonous plant spoils the fun. Before you head outside this fall, learn to recognize common types of skin-irritating foliage.

    Identifying Poison Ivy 

    Most of us have heard the old adage, “leaves of three, leave it be,” but many plants have three leaves on a stem. Poison ivy can climb trees and structures like a vine, crawl in the shadows like an ordinary shrub, or trail along the ground beneath the undergrowth, making identification more difficult. To spot poison ivy, look for clusters of three leaves in a triangular arrangement at the tips of the stems. Poison ivy is red in the spring and fall. In the summer, the leaves turn a waxy bright green.

    Knowing Poison Oak Differences

    Poison oak also grows in a three-leaved arrangement, but while the leaves of poison ivy have smooth edges, poison oak’s leaves are divided into rounded lobes. The leaves are green in spring and summer, turning bright red or brown in the fall. Poison oak normally grows in a shrub shape, but some types grow in vine form.

    Spotting Poison Sumac

    Poison sumac is a shrub or small tree. Each leaf has a woody central stem with one pointed leaflet on the tip, followed by four to seven pairs of leaflets arranged along the sides. Poison sumac is green in spring and begins turning scarlet red in the summer.

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  •   General Information, Wellness

    Do you turn into a couch potato during football season? Don’t worry—with a bit of balance, you can stay fit and still enjoy watching your favorite sport. Fall means football, and football season can mean hours of sitting on the couch, cheering on your favorite team.

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  •   Injury, Wellness

    Fall sports, such as soccer and football, are well underway. Keep your kids’ eyes safe while they play. One-third of all sports-related eye injuries involve kids, according to the American Academy of Ophthalmology.

    Whether your child is on the mat or the field, he is at risk for a potentially serious incident. The three most common causes of eye injuries in sports are:

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  •   Wellness, Injury

    When athletes ignore warning signs of concussion, the consequences can be both immediate and long-term.

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  •   Wellness
    *click below to see enlarged version

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    Before you get started on your children’s list of back-to-school supplies, take a few minutes to brush up on some health and wellness tips to ensure they’re ready to focus on learning.

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    Tick bites are most common during the summer, when the weather is warmer and people spend more time outdoors.

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