Skip the Tricks and Choose Safe Treats This Halloween

Costumes, candy, black cats and full moons—October 31 can bring out the kid in all of us. Don’t be deceived, however, because this spooktacular, kid-friendly holiday can present many dangers.

Ensure your children stay safe this Halloween by making sure they follow these health and safety tips.

  • Avoid baggy, floppy or oversized costumes, including hats and wigs—This precaution will help reduce the risks of tripping and falling or blocked vision.
  • Don’t allow them to trick-or-treat alone—Always go with your child or ensure they walk with a large group of friends.
  • Make sure they are seen—Attach reflective tape to costumes and bags to help ensure drivers see you.
  • Walk this way—Walk on sidewalks and pedestrian crossings whenever possible.
  • Light up the night—Always take a flashlight trick-or-treating.
  • Take caution around pets—It’s best to stay away from pets, as the commotion of trick-or-treating and costuming may frighten animals.
  • Never go into a stranger’s home—Even if the candy is “just inside” or the home is staged as a “haunted house walk-through,” it isn’t worth the risk. Stay on the porch or stoop.
  • Throw out suspicious treats—Candy that is unwrapped or wrappers that look tampered with, torn or are loosely wrapped should promptly be thrown away.
  • Only eat pre-packaged goodies—Do not allow your child to eat homemade food items from a stranger’s house.
  • Pass out healthy alternatives—If you’re handing out treats, consider giving small prizes instead of candy.
  • Ration out candy—Children are often proud of much loot they collect trick-or-treating, but too much candy is unhealthy. Don’t allow your child to keep the spoils of Halloween in his or her room. Instead, keep candy out of reach and monitor how much your child eats.

Sources:

mpdc.dc.gov, cdc.gov, cpsc.gov, parents.com, marthastewart.com, aaos.org